The Future Workspace That Isn’t the Workplace

As offices reopen there is an on-going debate whether people will return to the office full time or continue to work remotely. Could there be another option that people can choose where to work from?

 

London WeWork South Bank. Image via WeWork

 

As we begin to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been much speculation and debate about whether we will return to our old habits of working in the office 5 days a week, or if working from home creates equal or greater productivity. However, many believe that the future of the workforce will largely be focused on a balance between in-person and in-office working, and a form of remote working, that summates into a new, hybrid model. But if you’re not at home, and you’re not working, then you must be somewhere else- exploring the true in-between of a public and a private space. Enter the concept of the “third” place, which is used to describe everything from coffee shops to banks, and even co-working spaces. If you’ve ever studied for an exam at a bookstore, or even dropped into an airport restaurant to catch up on some work, then you too, have visited a “third” place.

Read More

Will a Hybrid Workforce Model Work for Your Business?

After a year of remote work and work from home it is anticipated most companies will adopt a more flexible or hybrid work policy as the workforce starts returning to the office post pandemic.

 

The key question is will the hybrid work model work for every business? What are the pros and cons of going hybrid?

 

Will a Hybrid Workforce Model Work for Your Business?
Getty Images

Today we are living in a largely separated world, connected by technology. While we moved to a work-from-home model in the spring out of necessity, many employees have become used to working from home and its many conveniences. Gen Y and Millennial workers no longer see work-from-home as a perk, rather it’s become a requirement. The relentless demand for talent will now make work-from-home a competitive and differentiating feature.

 

Although leaders have discovered that remote work can be just as productive, many have also noticed that it has some shortcomings. Balancing the company and employee needs has left CEOs with hard decisions about how we will work moving forward.

Read More

“WE’RE NOT GOING BACK”: THE POST-CRISIS WORKPLACE IS HYBRID

The hybrid work model has been gaining a lot of attention and the popular consensus is that most organizations will incorporate some kind of work flexibility for the returning workforce. Therefore the hybrid workplace model will be widely adopted by most companies post pandemic.

 

But what are the benefits for and expectations of companies going hybrid?

 

  • A survey by IDC carried out in August 2020 found that before the Covid-19 pandemic, 8.4% of people in the US worked from home full or part-time, and in the post-crisis future, that figure is expected to be 15.8%
  • Because flexible work has proven to be highly beneficial, the future will incorporate hybrid work.
  • A hybrid approach combines the benefits of working from home with the core reasons we use offices.

 

Does working from home actually work?

 

Like everything, it depends on who you ask. It depends on their circumstances, their home setup, their job role, their individual personality, and whether or not they have noisy kids.

Read More

The 2021 State of Remote Work

While remote work is not new it has gained a lot of attention in the past year as a result of COVID-19.

 

We share here top insights and data from one of the largest remote work reports – The 2021 State of Remote Work report – put together by Buffer.

 

 

 

This past year, everything changed in the world of remote work.

 

Remote work went from a niche decision some companies made to an inevitable and massive shift in the way that people work around the world. While working from home doesn’t offer the same benefits of truly remote work, it is still a remote experience.

 

As a result of this shift, the 2021 State of Remote Work looks very different this year. To start, our survey asked very different questions. We still looked into the benefits and struggles of remote work, and whether or not people wanted to keep working remotely (even if they were pushed into it rather suddenly). We also found out how many of our respondents worked remotely as a result of COVID-19, and how their experiences differ from folks who worked remotely prior to 2020.

Read More

Co-working spaces poised for comeback as businesses adopt hybrid office model

Many industry players are expecting demand for flexible office space to increase after the COVID-19 pandemic. This bodes well for co-working space operators especially after a challenging year of lockdowns and work from homes.

 

With people returning to work and organizations adopting a hybrid work policy co-working spaces are poised for a comeback. Here is a quick preview of where co-working spaces are headed.

 

post image
The Bat Haus Coworking and Event Space in Brooklyn, N.Y. (Shridhar Gupta photo)

Co-working spaces, like many other businesses, were caught flat-footed by the drastic drop in activity when the pandemic hit last year.

 

Almost overnight, people worldwide fled shared offices to work from the safety of their homes. The drastic drop in customers forced some co-working centers to close, while others had to rapidly adapt their offering to weather the coronavirus storm.

 

Now, with employers growing more optimistic that it will be safe for staff to return in the near term, demand is poised to rebound this year as many organizations consider allowing employees to continue to work remotely at least on a partial basis, real-estate experts and business operators say.

Read More

Redesigning the Post-Pandemic Workplace

Work as we know it is forever changed by COVID-19. Now is the time for managers to envision the office that employees will return to.

 

This research piece sheds light on how organizations should rethink, reinvent and redesign the post-pandemic workplace for their returning workforce.

 

Image courtesy of Ken Orvidas/theispot.com

The world has experienced widespread disruption over the past year as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. With the successful development and distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine, the timeline for when the so-called next normal will arrive is clearer. Leaders should begin to take steps to consider what the workplace will look like when it arrives.

 

There is no going back to the prepandemic workplace. Organizations and individuals have had no choice but to discover new ways of working. Many have reported successfully implementing years’ worth of digital transformation plans over the course of a few months. Even companies that needed to maintain a significant colocated workplace used digital innovations to improve employee and customer engagement and safety. Managers should begin asking themselves how they can build on such innovations to further transform their businesses instead of planning a return to ways of working that were becoming outdated and obsolete even before the pandemic.

Read More

Long live remote work: Why the global workplace is forever changed

How has the workplace changed with remote work?

 

This article 

 

post image
Vlada Karpovich photo

Once office workers at French carmaker Groupe PSA return after the country’s coronavirus lockdown is over, they’ll find that 85 percent of office space is now or is in the process of being converted to meeting areas.

 

The carmaker’s plan is that even once all Covid-19 restrictions are lifted and regardless of what country they are in, PSA’s non-manufacturing staff will work remotely two-thirds of the time in a so-called hybrid model.

 

Yes, it took a pandemic to usher in a global work revolution, and the workplace is forever changed.

 

The pandemic has overhauled how organizations and employees think of work, accelerating into several months or even weeks trends that had been slowly developing for years.

Read More

Tips to Avoid the Nightmare Before Your Halloween Event at Work

Coworking spaces aren’t just meeting rooms for hire or desk rentals for you to plug your laptop into and work in isolation. It has been established that what makes shared workspaces special is the community it builds and the collaboration that develops within that community.

 

One of the ways to establish a coworking community is by providing areas where they can mingle or work together, such as relatively relaxed living room-style spaces or cafeterias with big tables where bigger groups of people can sit together.

 

Another is by hosting a variety of events such as those that help members develop new skills or improve on existing ones, meet-ups with potential partners, clients or investors, and even the occasional party that gives everyone an opportunity to relax and have informal engagements with each other.

 

Continue reading “Tips to Avoid the Nightmare Before Your Halloween Event at Work”

TEDx Talks: Co-Working Ideas Worth Spreading

You probably have watched at least one TED Talk video on YouTube or on the TED Talks website. If you have never heard about TED, it is a non-profit organization devoted to spreading ideas. TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design (get it?) converged, and a whole spectrum of topics — from science to business to global issues.

 

 

Meanwhile, independently run TEDx events help share ideas in communities around the world. TEDx brings the spirit of TED’s mission of ideas worth spreading to local communities around the globe. Click here to learn more about TEDx.

 

We’ve collected some of the more recent (and not so old but still very relevant) TEDx Talks  featuring ideas about co-working, the independent worker, remote working, and the future of workspaces for your viewing pleasure.

Continue reading “TEDx Talks: Co-Working Ideas Worth Spreading”

Essential Tools for Co-Working

 

No matter what line of work you are in, your skills, intelligence, talent, or even luck may not be always enough to help you succeed or reach your goal in a short amount of time.

 

There will always be a need for tools — whether hardware or software — that will help you manage the little things more efficiently and effectively, so you will have more time to deal with the big things and do what you do best.

 

Continue reading “Essential Tools for Co-Working”